Roast Pork Tenderloin with Blood Oranges has everything I want in a winter dish—a little bit indulgent, but also bright and flavorful. This dish uses blood oranges as a marinade, in the sauce, and as a garnish. Serve this for an occasion or for a work-from-home weeknight—again, my kind of dish! This post may contain affiliate links, meaning that I get a commission if you take advantage of the offer (thank you!).

For when you want something a bit fancy and easy

I don’t know about you, but, every now and again, I want a bit of a fancy main course that takes almost zero effort. I want something that looks and tastes amazing, and I want it to come together easily. Enter Roast Pork Tenderloin with Blood Oranges. Comforting and bright, this is the perfect dish for cold winter days.

Citrus is winter’s redeeming quality

I’m still OK with the snow situation, but with three storms due in the same week, I might flip the switch to screaming “DEATHFLAKES!” for the rest of the year any day now. When that happens, I look for winter’s redeeming quality, and that quality is citrus. No grapefruit is safe from me during the dark days of winter, and I incorporate more citrus into my cooking (or make salads with it—Winter Citrus Salad, anyone?).

Blood oranges and herbs. Image shows four blood orange halves, along with several oranges, a sprig of rosemary, a sprig of thyme, and sprigs of parsley are visible

I spied some gorgeous blood oranges

I found some blood oranges at the market the other day, and I decided to roast a pork tenderloin with them. Blood oranges are sweet and bitter at the same time, which is my idea of a good thing when it comes to meat dishes. That and they are gorgeous. Just slices of them look like a holiday. Perfect for a week with three snowstorms on tap.

Roast Pork Tenderloin with Blood Oranges puts those beauties to use!

Roast Pork Tenderloin with Blood Oranges starts with a marinade in fresh-squeezed blood orange juice, some honey, garlic, and herbs. That marinade is transformed into a lovely sauce, reduced while the tenderloin cooks.

The roast itself has blood orange slices on top. The oranges flavor the dish, and become a festive garnish.

Suitable for an occasion, but easy enough for a WFH weeknight

You could serve Roast Pork Tenderloin with Blood Oranges for a dinner party (the recipe is for one pork tenderloin, but you could easily scale it, using the guide in the recipe), or on a work-from-home weeknight. The only real time involved is the two- or three-hour marinade in the fridge and letting the tenderloin come to room temperature before roasting. You do need to keep an eye on things while the tenderloin roasts, but you can make the sauce at the same time.

Roast Pork Tenderloin with Blood Oranges, served on a plate decorated with fruit and a stencil design. A sauce pitcher is on the left-hand side of the plate

Roast Pork Tenderloin with Blood Oranges is absolutely delicious

And this dish? It tastes SO good. It took a little trial and error to get this dish right, but the flavor was never the issue. The honey softens the bitterness of the orange, and the rosemary and garlic come through to balance everything and bring it together. The sauce isn’t heavy, with only a pat of finishing butter that you could leave out if you wished. I’d pair it with mashed potatoes for a festive occasion, or perhaps boiled potatoes for a weeknight, either one would let you soak up that sauce. Roast Pork Tenderloin with Blood Oranges is bright and comforting, just the thing for winter.

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Roast Pork Tenderloin with Blood Oranges, served on a plate decorated with fruit and a stencil design. A sauce pitcher is on the left-hand side of the plate

Roast Pork Tenderloin with Blood Oranges

Roast Pork Tenderloin with Blood Oranges has everything I want in a winter dish—a little bit indulgent, but also bright and flavorful. This dish uses blood oranges as a marinade, in the sauce, and as a garnish. Serve this for an occasion or for awork-from-home weeknight—again, my kind of dish!
There's not much hands-on time involved here, except for making the sauce, which takes less than 10 minutes. However, do note that you should marinate the dish for at least 2 hours, preferably 3-4.
Pork tenderloin can overcook very easily, so keep an eye on it. About half-way through the recommended cook time, take a temperature check with a meat thermometer and turn the pan to help ensure even cooking. Continue to check as needed.
Prep Time 5 mins
Cook Time 25 mins
Marinate time 3 hrs
Total Time 3 hrs 30 mins
Course Main Course
Cuisine American
Servings 2 people

Equipment

  • 1 Meat Thermometer The ThermoPop from ThermoWorks gives a quick read, helpful for this dish (affiliate link)
  • 1 Roasting dish, small
  • 1 Sauce pan, small

Ingredients
  

For the Marinade

  • cup blood orange juice, fresh squeezed 2-3 blood oranges
  • 2 tbsp honey
  • 1 sprig rosemary, cut in half
  • 1 sprig thyme, cut in half
  • 2 sprigs flat-leaf Italian parsley
  • 1 clove garlic, crushed to taste, if cloves are small, use 2
  • 1 1 ¼ lb pork tenderloin weight is approximate
  • 1 tbsp neutral oil
  • kosher salt
  • 8 black pepper corns, cracked to taste

To Roast and Serve

  • 1 tsp neutral oil
  • 1 blood orange, sliced
  • reserved marinade
  • 1 pat unsalted butter, cold optional, but recommended

Instructions
 

Marinate the Pork Tenderloin

  • Add the honey to the blood orange juice and mix to combine
    ⅓ cup blood orange juice, fresh squeezed, 2 tbsp honey
  • Season the pork tenderloin generously with kosher salt on all sides. Add the cracked pepper and drizzle with the oil. Using your hands, spread the oil and pepper on the meat
    1 tbsp neutral oil, kosher salt, 8 black pepper corns, cracked, 1 1 ¼ lb pork tenderloin
  • Add the pork tenderloin to a large resealable plastic bag. Add the blood orange juice and honey mixture. Add the herbs and garlic. Seal the bag, and mix thoroughly to combine
    1 sprig rosemary, cut in half, 1 sprig thyme, cut in half, 1 clove garlic, crushed, 2 sprigs flat-leaf Italian parsley
    Marinating pork tenderloin
  • Marinate the pork tenderloin in the refrigerator for at least 2, but preferably 3–4 hours (see instruction below about when to remove from the fridge)

Roast the Tenderloin

  • About 30 minutes before you want to start cooking, remove the marinated pork tenderloin from the refrigerator, but leave it in the bag
  • Preheat oven to 400F
  • When ready to roast the tenderloin, remove the tenderloin from the marinade (reserve the marinade!) and pat dry with paper towels
  • In a roasting dish, add the oil, and spread to coat the pan. Add the tenderloin to the dish
    1 tsp neutral oil
  • Strain the marinade into a sauce pan
    reserved marinade
  • Retrieve the rosemary and thyme and lay them on top of the tenderloin. Retrieve the garlic and tuck the pieces around the tenderloin so that they are reasonably evenly spaced
  • Lay the orange slices on top of the tenderloin and herbs, evenly spaced
    1 blood orange, sliced
  • Roast the tenderloin on the middle rack of the oven for about 20-25 minutes, until the internal temperature in the thickest part reaches 145F. About halfway through cook time, check the temperature with a meat thermometer to help gauge cook time. It's a good idea to turn the pan to help ensure even cooking. Keep an eye on the roast to make sure that it doesn't overcook
  • Remove from oven and let rest for 10 minutes before serving

Make the Sauce

  • In the small sauce pan where you strained the marinade, bring the marinade to a boil over medium-high heat, and reduce, stirring constantly, until the liquid has reduced by about half
  • Remove from heat. Add pat of cold butter to enrich the sauce and whisk constantly to combine. Set aside until serving (if necessary, can heat very slowly)
    1 pat unsalted butter, cold

Serve

  • To serve, cut into thick slices (the middle will be the most tender). Plate by pouring the sauce over the slices and garnishing with slices of blood orange from the roast
    Roast Pork Tenderloin with Blood Oranges, served on a plate decorated with fruit and a stencil design. A sauce pitcher is on the left-hand side of the plate

Video

Keyword blood orange, pork, pork tenderloin
Tried this recipe?Let me know what you think!

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